Nancy Chung

Mechanical Engineer, Cordless Expansion

Meghan:

Tell us about your favorite projects you have completed at the Makerspace.

Nancy:

My first big project at the Makerspace was my workbench. It was mostly made with 2x3s, 2x4s, and a sheet of OSB, but the top was actually made with scrap wood from Geoff Howard’s Redstone Rocket. The bottom sheet is a shelf for my Portable Power Station so that if I take the cart outside where I don’t have power, I can still run corded power tools. One side has pegboard for hand tool storage and the other side has shelves for power tool storage. I also added a magnetic bar to the front for additional hand tool storage. To build it, I just used standard woodworking tools like a miter saw, table saw, drill, impact driver, nailer and circular saw.

Herringbone table

I also recently built a small table out of pallet wood. I used the pallet wood to make a herringbone pattern for the table top and the frame and legs are made out of 2x3s and 2x4s. To take apart the pallet, I used a hammer, reciprocating saw and jigsaw and to build the table I used the same tools I used to build the workbench.

Cigar Box Ukelele

I’m also in the process of making a cigar box ukulele! The cigar box and neck are made of cedar, and the frets will be made of wire coat hanger. For the bridge and saddle that the strings will rest on, I found some 3D models online which I can modify to fit the size of the ukulele I’m building that I can 3D print. Building this will require a router, band saw and jointer, in addition to the woodworking tools I mentioned earlier.

 

Meghan:

What is your role at Stanley Black and Decker? Tell us a little about what a “day in the life” of you is like.

Nancy:

I’m a mechanical engineer on the cordless expansion team. I’m currently working on the all-purpose area light. There isn’t much of a typical day at work for me, sometimes it’s doing work behind a desk where I’m designing product in CAD, running simulations and calculations, and other times I’m doing more hands on work where I’m building up units, tearing down units, and testing our products.

 

Meghan:

What do you love about the Makerspace?

Nancy:

Having access to a well-equipped workspace! I live in an apartment, so I don’t have space for the tools I need to work on my projects. The Makerspace has given me the ability to work on all these projects that I’ve wanted to make for a while. I also love that we can learn how to use all these machines and tools that SBD makes. Before having the Makerspace, there were a lot of basic tools that SBD makes that I didn’t feel comfortable using. It’s cool to have a place where I can learn and practice using those tools!

 

Meghan:

What classes have you taken and which do you plan to take?

Nancy:

I’ve taken most of the classes at this point! I’ve taken classes for the laser engraver, woodworking, metal shop, MIG welding, TIG welding, plasma cutting, and the ShopBot. I would really like to learn how to use the Bridgeport CNC Mill though.

 

Meghan:

You are one of our wonderful volunteer instructors – tell us about the class you teach.

Nancy:

I teach the 3D printing class at the Makerspace. I had previously taught classes at a 3D printing studio and currently use 3D printing quite frequently as a design engineer at this company. I love it because it’s such an easy way to get people interested making and designing their own things, and as an engineer, it’s a great way for us to test and validate our designs.

 

Meghan:

What kind of projects do you like to work on and what materials do you like to work with?

Nancy:

I’ve mostly done woodworking projects so far because I’m more familiar with it. I would like to do more metalworking now that I’ve learned how to MIG and TIG weld.

 

Meghan:

What is your favorite type of music to work to?

Nancy:

I like working to the Foo Fighters, although I don’t get the chance to listen to music too frequently while I’m working because the machines and tools are so loud!

 

Meghan:

Tell us one fun fact about yourself!

Nancy:

My first invention came to me when I was just 5 years old. I hated how when you applied liquid glue to something, it would be uneven and soak through to the other side of the paper. So what I decided to do was poke a skewer through the bottle of glue so that there would be a thin layer of glue on the skewer which I could spread evenly and quickly onto the piece of paper. I thought it was a genius idea, until I showed my mom and she got mad at me for poking holes in all the glue bottles, and pointed out that I could’ve just removed the cap and dipped it in from the top. I like to believe that my designs are now a little bit more thought out, haha!